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consequences of changes in election procedures. we almost always get what we think we're going to get but then there's always something else that follows on. and one is, the behavior of voters with an expectation, particularly in an era of e-government. why shouldn't my records and ballots be available where ever i choose to go? the second thing, and military installations if you want to improve the child halls, the general always makes the food better. one of the things i think is interesting with election officials is how many of us vote on election day. how many of us experience that line, that q. and the answer is, most of us vote absentee because of that responsibility. so one of the things i've tried to do over the years is ideal in advance to ago and i stand in line and i learned a lot. i learnt a lot by listening to people, but that may be something as a professional goal for each of us is experienced the line come experience the way, experience the location. all right? >> my name is lorenzo. i have almost 10 months experience in the selection process. i worked at a trainer an
were not prepared for that. ongoing litigation. it was constantly, election administration was constantly embattled in a court. courts would intervene, state supreme court would make an emergency decision that secretary of state would decide whether to appeal the decision. it caused a lot of inconsistency and uneasiness going into the election not knowing how our provisional ballot would be counted, not knowing if it was a poll worker's responsibility or the voter's responsibility to fill out the provisional envelope, not knowing if we would have extended hours or weekend hours, preparing all that transcended into our budget, transcended into issues, do we have additional parking, do we get more temporaries, do we open in house voting stations, all contingent on the turnout. that would be at the board based on those decisions. in litigation, out comes by the secretary of state and other interested parties. early voting became a hot-button issue in ohio. that is one event. recommendations as an election administrator, the need to -- for consistent uniformity across the state
were on the ground during the 2012 elections discuss how volunteers and run voting precincts with long lines, people showing up at the rahm polling place, and other issues. the event was hosted by the elections commission, which was established in reaction to the 2000 presidential election. this is 90 minutes. >> good morning, everyone. my name is a house miller. i am the director and chief operating officer of the elections commission. i want to thank you for being with us today. i wanted to care panelists. -- to thank our panelists. we're having a discussion on the 2012 elections, with -- and with the group we have gathered, we will be able to accomplish this easily and i want to inform the audience watching that we have an actor -- active twitter account that will be able to respond to questions. #beready2012. we have four panels of some of the representative cross-section of election workers, administrators, and research advocates as well as state and local election officials. in short, here to discuss the 2012 presidential election are observers of elections and those who monitor
'm not asking anyone else to write any checks until i hear something that makes sense to me. since the election there have been a lot of gatherings and meetings among those who are active in raising money. the question is are we united in drying that up from the people i have talked to? the answer is yes. krystal ball, when you have lost the socialites, i believe the republicans have nothing left to lose. >> well, it -- >> what else is there? this is rock bottom? >> it looks pretty bleak. >> a hack, fundraiser. >> she had strong words there, well, i was looking back at the analysis "the washington post" did last summer regarding the republican party, and the sort of old republicans which i assume she is, fiscally conservative, typically northeastern, typically well off still make up about 22% of the party. so a decent chunk of the party. and what georgeette there shows, they make up a certain amount of the funding base which is why they have had a lock on the republican party. and the innovation for the growth of the tea party is their ability to have larger scale donor movements, smaller dolla
this fight just like he won the election. just like he won the debate over raising taxes on the rich. and the american people are behind him. a new poll shows 52% approve of the president's handling of the fiscal cliff deal that raised taxes on the wealthy just 31% support speaker boehner. 57% say president obama got more of what he wanted. just 20% say that about the gop. republicans may not be good at a lot of things, but i do think they can read the poll numbers. they know their approach isn't working which is why gop leaders have begun to waffle on the party's threat not to raise the debt limit. >> we have to use whatever leverage we have. and there are some examples of leverage can coming along. the debt ceiling is one of them. that hopefully would get the president engaged. >> hopefully? whatever leverage we have? doesn't sound like a guy who's confident to me. and john boehner's in the same tight spot. the wall street journal says that boehner thinks that that bill is just one point of leverage. he says he hedges by noting that it is not the ultimate leverage. when a politicia
. and we also just had a little thing called an election. remember that? you know, when just over a month ago, the country rejected republican ideology. but the gop hasn't learned a thing. they're threatening a government shultdown. voting against disaster relief, pushing radical anti-abortion measures. they might actually be funny if they weren't so contemptible. >>> with me now, bob schram, a democratic strategist and columnist for "the daily beast" and abbyhuffington. >>> can the gop learn the chris christie lesson? or are they drinksiing too much from the tea party? >> he's conceivably a very strong candidate for them in 20167. but increasingly, i think he can't be nominated. it's not just that he embraced or worked with the hurricane, it's not just that he called john boehner to account for denying hurricane relief. it's that he uses that word compromise. he believes in governing. and he'd have to run in a party whose primary voters think the first qualification to the presidency is that you hate the dwovt. so i think he's a lock for reelection, i think he's a way forward and i think
. that the president of the united states, elected to lead the country, is so reluctant to engage on the most important issue regarding our future. >> but you understand what the president told me last week and other democrats have said, the republicans had a chance to say yes to a number of things, in addition to the trillion dollars of spending cuts that were en80ed as part of the budget control act of last year. they could have had additional cuts in entitlement programs if you had agreed before you did it in this temporary measure. going back to the summer of 2011, the president said to all of you republican leaders, if you didn't have such a hard time saying yes to me as president we could have solved some of these issues why. is he off base about that? >> you can relitigate the past if you want to. where we are now is we have resolved the revenue issue, and the question is, what are we going to do about spending? i wish the president would lead us in this discussion, rather than putting himself in a position of having to be dragged kicking and screaming to the table to discuss the single biggest
on an open door here. >> yeah. >> and it is legacy material. he won re-election on one of only eight presidents to win two terms by 51% of the popular vote. what does he use that mandate for? also -- >> that's your question. when are you going to do what you got there to do? stop worry being getting there again. >> the presidents don't always just follow public opinion, they have to shape public opinion. >> can i ask you -- okay. i'm a suburbanite city mouse. i generally have lived in suburban areaings, but i don't know why you need a gun show. i mean, if you want to buy a gun, you go to a dealer. why do you have to have a show? why does it have to be a big hotel opens its doors to a bunch of gun salesmen and people -- >> well -- >> why do you have to have a gun show? >> far be it from me to comment in depth on gun culture but i do think it's fun. gun shows are fun. it's like auto shows. >> you walk out with -- >> if you have the universal background check that the governor is talking about, then fine. the problem with gun shows is they're used as a huge loophole to sell a lot of unr
decision in the wake of president obama's re-election. the republican party is divided. that's being isolated and ignored by the right wingers. that's a problem for the gop. that southern dominance may sentence the entire party to irrelevance. >>> conservative ideologues are itching for another fight with president obama, this time saying they may shut down the government altogether or risk a credit catastrophe. could somebody remind these guys who won the election, again. >>> plus, the nra has made its position clear. the answer to gun violence, more guns. we have evidence that posting armed guards everywhere has the exact opposite effect. the latest battle lines as the obama administration moves to curb the availability of assault weapons. >>> let me finish with why this nomination of chuck hagel should be given a solid, solid chance, and this is "hardball," the place for politics, >>> hillary clinton is back at work at the state department. this morning she chaired the weekly meeting of the department's leadership team, and one thing on the agenda will be testifying on capitol hil
of the agenda. it's an obligationed based on the nature of the electorate that re-elected barack obama. i think that's job one. >> john: well, latino voters put this president in office twice and he promised repeatedly that it would be top of his agenda. do you think he'll follow through with his promise and push through legislation this month and what kind of reform he'll consider since he has made the dream act law already. >> i think he'll formalize that and put in place the mechanism by which the dream act is a stepping stone to comprehensive reform. pardon me. >> john: go ahead, please. >> whether or not he has time much more than that, i don't know. but once he gets a system in place, and it's operating and you know, thousands and thousands of people come out of the shadows, it will be very hard caring what happened last fall to roll anything back. >> john: let me ask you about his nominees. they'll throw as much mud at chuck hagel for the unspeakable crime of being of the about the iraq war, do you think they'll slow down the process trying to bog it down or will they see john kerry sail
. ♪ >>> energized by his re-election and that fiscal cliff deal, president obama is now taking ogg on two of washington's most powerful special interest groups. pro-gun and pro-israel lobbies. dominating chuck hagel point to a president unafraid of going head to head with two powerful lobbying groups that have long wheeleded strong influence in washington. i'm joined by national journal political correspondent beth rinehart who writes about the president's busting second term. >> thanks for having me. >> the president is relishing his approval numbers and the fact that he didn't have to run again. he actually talked about the second term on "meet the press." i want to play that. >> one of the nice things about never having another election again. i will never campaign again. is you know, i think you can rest assured that all i care about is making sure i leave behind an america that is stronger, more prosperous, more stable and secure than when i first came into office. >> the first thing, rahm emanuel when chief of staff, had this policy, you don't take on a fight that you don't have a r
he won the election, wendell willkie, fuji beach, was in the office and they remained friends. he said to the president why do you keep that man so close to you, that man being hopkins. wilkie didn't like hopkins and roosevelt said you know, you may be in this office some day and you'll understand. but he asks for nothing except to serve me. >>> now to the university of alabama law school in tuscaloosa for a discussion of labor and employment law. civil rights leaders and retired federal judge u.w. clemon spoke to students about the history of title seven of the civil rights act. this is about an hour. >> on behalf of the society and the american constitutional society, we'd like to welcome you all today to a remarkable speaker, the honorable u.w. clemon. the former chief judge of the united states district court for the northern district of alabama. long before his notable career on the federal bench, justice u.w. clemon distinguished himself as a civil rights activist, lawyer and alabama state senator. as a student educated in the segregated public schools of jefferson county, h
a senator. said he would only serve two terms. only served two terms. and when he was elected the second time, he was elected with 83% of the vote. this is a guy respected by his fellow citizens of nebraska. served here for a total of 12 years. and what did he do when he left the senate? he came became an ac testimony knick georgetown, school of foreign service, teaching the new leaders. he also has been co-chairman of the president's intelligence advisory board. he is alsos on the defense policy board. this is a gentleman who knows all of these issues in depth. he is a fellow who speaks his mind. he sometimes gets in trouble with those who think he should not speak his mind but he says what he believes and he sticks with t so the issues that are being raised now are important issues and that's why we have a confirmation hearing and i'm sure that chuck will be able to deal with those issues at the hearing. >> let's go through a few of them. >> all right. >> he failed to label iran's revolutionary guard a terror organization, advocated direct talks with iran which have not borne fruit and
know, you get elected officials you deserve, and i know this. i'm a politician. they respond to pressure, and they respond to incentives, and unless -- we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany, or city hall, but we can organize. we have the power to exercise pressure, demands, influence on our elected officials. so we have to get much more active if we're going to have a society that is going to respond to this enduring problem. the rate of child poverty in the united states of america, we should be ashamed a nation this strong has child poverty, and the kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, nutritionally fit to learn, material ready to learn, and that's the lie or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to the flag, the phrase, accomplish justice for all,shoo be a demand, compelling as separation, and should be a conscious conviction to mak
it will end up? >> well, i think all through the election season, all they ever talk about was leaving afghanistan, but this is real. this was a very big deal this week and a very big change. u.s. troops will be in an advise and train -- that's all they'll be doing come spring. >> pulling back from the front lines. >> pulling back from the front lines. they will be with afghan forces. the president has not announced how fast they'll draw down but i suspect by the end of this year we could be down to 30,000 troops. we're 66,000 troops now, possibly down to 30,000 and when we really draw down in 2014, when we are no longer doing combat missions, i think you'll see anywhere from only 6,000 to 9,000 and the important thing to remember about that, george, is two details. tail means the enablers, the support, we would really have if we had 3,000 troops there, we would really have only 800 trigger pullers. you'll see a lot of counterterrorism action, all of those things joe biden talked about a long time ago. i think that's all we'll have there in the future. >> senator corker, are you comfor
direction? >> we have lost two national elections, i would say no. we're in politics to win, we need to think about doing something different. >> today, governor chris christie appeared on five morning shows and is also on the cover of this week's issue "time magazine." today, the governor gave the republicans this advice. >> what are you getting right that republicans in washington, d.c. are getting so wrong? what don't they get? >> we're compromising when we need to. i'm in divided government. i have a democratic senate and democratic assembly. so what that means is, i'm not going to get everything i want. >> here is what chris christie thinks of the tea party. >> i don't think they have had too much influence, and i think there is a lot of things -- >> you don't think that is why the house republicans have not been able to get to a fiscal cliff deal? >> you know i think there are a lot of reasons, some of them personal, they get into these kind of toxic competitions with each other, and these internal palace intrigue things, don't look at me puzzled. >> you mean john boehner -- >>
is behind me. i won this election convincingly. now, i'm not sure how much the debt ceiling played into the election for average voters, but i think president obama is trying to say, look, i have a mandate. i won a second term amid this economic crisis, amid questions about my handling of it, and now it's up to you guys, whether you want to deal with me or deal with the consequences. >> and he knows the difference in his popularity compared to the congressional popularity. >> right. >> susan page, we talked about this on friday. now, the question that jackie of the "new york times" asked of the president. the lack of diversity in his frontline cabinet appointments so far, this was his response. >> i would just suggest that everybody kind of wait until they've seen all my appointments, who is in the white house staff and who is in my cabinet before they rush to judgment. >> well, was that compelling and persuasive and convincing? >> well, i think we should expect the next appointments to have some female faces, whether they're top aides to the treasury secretary or the new budget di
ben cramer wrote "what it takes," a thousand-plus page book about the 1988 presidential election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis, and george herbert walker bush. nbc first read calls it the unofficial textbook of washington. if you haven't read it, then you don't get it. richard ben cramer was 62. we'll be right back. ♪ i have direct deposit on my visa prepaid. my paycheck is loaded right on my card. automatic. i am not going downtown standing in line to cash it. i know where my money is, because it is in my pocket. i got more time with my daughter, we got places to go. [ freeman ] go open a new world, with visa prepaid. more people go with visa. >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been 25 days since the shooting in newtown, connecticut, and two years since the massacre in tucson that left six dead and injured u.s. congresswoman gabrielle giffords. the vice president is spearheading a gun control task force in response, and outside organizations are organized to make sure this time gun laws are strengthened. g
election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis, and george herbert walker bush. nbc first read calls it the unofficial textbook of washington. if you haven't read it, then you don't get it. richard ben cramer was 62. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been 25 days since the shooting in newtown, connecticut, and two years since the massacre in tucson that left six dead and injured u.s. congresswoman gabrielle giffords. the vice president is spearheading a gun control task force in response, and outside organizations are organized to make sure this time gun laws are strengthened. gun control advocates are up against a vehement and sometimes incoherent opposition. one example, alex jones, who has called for piers morgan to be deported because of his positions. last night morgan asked jones why. take a look at the face on the pro-guns side. >> we did it to point out this is globalism, and the mega banks that control the planet and brag they have taken over in bloomberg, ap, reuters, you name it, brag tha
" a thousand-plus page book about the 1988 presidential election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis and george ber hert walker book. it's the unofficial textbook of washington. if you haven't read it, then you don't get it. richard ben cramer was 62. we'll be right back. i had pain in my pelvic area... and bleeding that wasn't normal for me. she said i had to go to the doctor. turned out i had uterine cancer, a type of gynecologic cancer. i received treatment and we're confident i'll be fine. please listen to your body. if something doesn't feel right for two weeks or longer, see your doctor. get the inside knowledge about gynecologic cancers. knowing can make all the difference in the world. [ male announcer ] the exclusive air suspension in the 2013 ram 1500. ♪ engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been 25 days thins the shooting in new toup, connecticut, and two years since the massacre in tucson that left
election because of controversial statements on the israeli reluctance. among the reason for that concern and in some cases outright opposition. seven of the 12 republican members of the armed services committee expressing some opposition with at least three senators already saying they will vote no. senator david fisher saying, i will be a no-vote and on the floor. south carolina senator lindsay gramm calling hegel and antagonistic and in-your-face nomination to all of those who support israel. freshman senator ted crews of texas absolutely unloading while calling him too weak for the job >> it is interesting. the president seems bound and determined to proceed down this path despite the fact that his record is troubling. he has not been a friend, and in my view, the united states should stand unshakeable with the nation of israel, and he is consistently advocating weakness with respect to our enemies, with respect to the nation of iran, he has exposed sanctions, and the job of the secretary of defense is to be a serious, credible strength and a deterrent and, unfortunately, i think weak
for the republican party. >> you're in politics to win to get your ideas. we lost two national elections in the row. we need to think about doing something different. >> there's plenty in new jersey in politics, as well. >> a lot less than there used to be. >> a new poll confirms christie winning support from both sides of the aisle. 73% of new jerseyans approve of him, including 62% of democrats. last night christie delivered his state of the state address, which was chock full of calls for cooperation. we don't have that sound. the washington post dana milbank paints christie as an anomaly. americans are crying out for an end to ideological warfare. that has developed into christie's signature in new jersey. a poll found support for the tea party is at record lows, while the poll found 24% called themselves tea party members in 2010, 8% see themselves as one now. evenly between democrats and republicans, that changed this past year. currently, 47% of americans identify with democrats compared to 42% who align with the gop. last night on "hardball," crusader dick army diagnosed the problem as mist
of americans all across this country and people around the world. and elected officials, i think, are really paying a lot more attention to this and then taking action. the leadership that is already come forward by president obama and then his asking vice president biden to take on this issue, the vice president's record is clear in terms of public safety and taking swift action to make america much safer. the vice president has been working this issue since the president asked him to jump on it, virtually, every day. so i think this is a unique moment. democrats, republicans, mayors, governors and we hear from the president and vice president. the vice president is having these meetings. he talked about what happened earlier today. something good is going to happen out of an incredible tragedy in connecticut and the tragedies that mothers and fathers and sisters and brothers and neighbors experience on a daily basis all across the cities of the united states. >> that's what i want to address. because newtown absolutely a despicable, unthinkable act. but we've been seeing in cities across t
one thing, it's president obama, not president mccain and not president romney that lost two elections. the american people have made it clear that they are not particularly interested in finding new conflicts to get into. and not particularly interested in saying, you know exsanctions are just a road bump on the way to bombing. we should be very, very careful when we sort of toss around theories of use of military for situations that might be resolved in other ways. the other thing i would like to say about iran, we don't want them to have a nuclear weapon >> we are punishing them severely now with the sanctions. we ought to keep it up. multilateral sanctions, whatever unilateral things we want to do. and also remember, this is a country in deep trouble, does not have a nuclear weapon yes. we don't want it to have one. but remember what we v i still am an old-fashioned realist that says deterrence still works and they should know what the consequences to them would be if they ever were to use or cause us to believe they were going to use such a weapon if they had it and they don't hav
election. a dramatic -- dramatic element in his success and obviously the republican party recognizes it's harsh language, some rhetoric used by mitt romney and other republicans around the country didn't help its chance of gaining support within that community. john boehner, the speaker of the house, has said that they need to have a more practical, a more pragmatic approach to this issue, so i think in many ways the white house feels confidently that -- that it has the lead on this issue right now and that it has the public on its side as well. >> all right. nbc's peter alexander with that latest development. thank you so much, peter. i want to bring in the political reporter for slate and msnbc contributor. dave, what do you think about this? it's called comprehensive immigration reform, so is this a surprise at all? >> oh, it's not a surprise. it was a promise that president obama made when he was elected the first time. >> right. >> the worry i think if you're an advocate for this is when you read stories about who might support this. you don't see many house republicans being quote
to this effect. you'll remember, mr. nugent told us that if the president was re-elected, he would either be dead or in jail, but he might need to enter a psychiatric institution because he says including eric holder, the attorney general and biden in talks on gun violence was, and i'm quoting him, like hiring jeffrey dahmer to tell us how to take care of our children. >> yeah, well, these and the other comments that karen was alluding to are helpful to those of us that want some common sense legislation because it shows the extremism and the marginalization of the gun advocates, but, look, there's a new pew poll that came out that shows the public overwhelmingly in favor of not just things like assault weapons bans and the high capacity magazines and background checks but even things like gun registries. so when people ask the question will a republican congress, will a republican house be able to block these measures, it's really the wrong question. the real question is how you translate this overwhelming public opinion in favor of common sense gun laws into actionened you need three things. yo
and the prosperities that we have gained. in the past many years. we also discussed the issue of election in afghanistan and the importance of elections for the afghan people with the hope that we'll be conducting a free and fair election in afghanistan where our friends in the international community and particularly the united states will be assisting in conducting those elections. of course. where afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve and i'm sure we will conduct it in detai
of this president. we probably will start right away recruiting challengers for the next elections. local union leaders, local party officials, and activists. we would happily send out an e- mail in the district to those who support medicare and social security and medicaid cuts. host: have you ever want that at some members of congress? guest: we have launched it publicly in the more generic sense, saying this is a warning. we want to be transparent. we don't learn from this nuclear war. for someone like me woke up every day in 2008 and thought, what can i do today to get barack obama elected president. he publicly admitted that he put social security benefits on the table. that's not a position i want to be in and not what i worked for and to thousand eight. host: did you work for it in 2012? guest: our organization prioritized congress in 2012. our number one candidate was elizabeth warren. she's already been told, calling out aig and big wall street bankers yesterday. we raised $1.5 million from grassroots contributions in this last election cycle. we raised $100,000 before she even announc
to imagine they're now going to come back and actually do something. >> if only there were a senator elected to washington -- >> who cared about the consumer. >> -- that steve rattner supported. >> i think i know where we're going. >> if only there were that person. you could just check them off. >> you know what? there is. >> steve didn't support him. >> absolutely. you are going to come around on elizabeth warren. you just are. who doesn't? elizabeth warren said this on the issue. aig's reckless bets nearly crashed our entire economy. taxpayers across this country saved aig from ruin. and it would be outrageous for this company to turn around and sue the federal government because they think the deal wasn't generous enough. steve. >> so i agree with elizabeth warren who's completely right. >> that's all i need to hear. you just made my morning. >> january 9th of the new session. >> check right there. >> it's amazing what a victory does. >> come on. >> something about 1,000 fathers and orphans. >> something like that. something like that. so i'm curious, mika. i'm reading "the new york time
in a democracy. meaningful democracy cannot exist when moneyed interests can buy elections and lobby of legislation. for example, 2/3 of americans support -- but in a logical fashion in congress is committed to blocking reform in this area. add to this list, concerted efforts to restrict bargaining rights of unions to deprive people of the right to vote and you appreciate the full measure of the democratic crisis we face. fourth and final issue is the challenge of finding a way to manage the economy and provide a good life for everyone. no solution to the problems of climate destruction can be found, the developed world reducing its level of carbon emissions. these four issues and a quality, corruption, inequality, corruption, crisis of democracy, sustainability fuelled the occupy movement. what we tried to do was explore and analyze the origins and see what can be done to bring our institutions to enlightenment. we also wanted to bring these four issues together into a narrative. we chose to route our narrative in american ideals of freedom and equality. to say that the ideas of fre
, it is an aggressive agenda. it is a lot of work. but they elect us to lead, my friends. we will. they elect us to perform and we will. we have proven that we can lead. we have proven that we can perform. we know that with these challenges at hand that is exactly what we must now do. we have daunting challenges. no doubt. but these challenges also pose exciting opportunities. yes, it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems, i know the issues. but, can you imagine how smart this state would be when we actually educate all our children to the best of the god given potential. when every black child and every white child and every urban child is educated to their full potential. i know helping the economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed and all of our cities are at full gain. i know women is have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historic. i know it is difficult. can you imagine what this soc
. [applause] to the elected and legislative to have been introducede before -- [applause] attorney general eric schneiderman, thank you for being here. senators, pleasure to be with you. i want to thank them for their leadership. the legislative accomplishments to really turn this state around. they were difficult and challenging because it went to the real heart of the issues. at this time i would ask the assembly and senate to stand so you can be recognized for your great work. [applause] members of the court, welcome to all of you. [applause] the capital looks a little bit different than it did over the past few years. the renovation has been complete. it was accelerated. it was extended. the building has been refurbished. it's skylights are open. it is in better shape than it has been in many, many years. [applause] i remember the first time i walked into the capital, when i was a young fellow, how i was awed and overwhelmed by the beauty and majesty of the building. somewhere along the way, it lost that luster. both physically and symbolically. we had a great team that worked tireless
autonomy lessons learned in collaboration through these public-private partnerships that elected the space station so there is all multipronged aspect that lead your plea to the bottom, not just the bottom line but the top line to what our economy does and what the jobs are being created both in michigan and all over the country. >> we have time for another question. >> i yield back my time. >> the chair now recognizes chairman smith for five minutes. >> thank you mr. chairman. let me address my first question to you. you report that there is not much support in the scientific and space community for a mission to a near earth asteroid in 2025. is such a mission absolutely necessary to help us get to mars or are there alternatives and are there alternative missions as well that can replace that mission to the asteroid? >> as we looked at the mengin to an asteroid that is in 2010 national space policy of the u.s., in addition to being widely accepted there were some shortcomings noted by some of the people that appeared before the committee. i know to -- i note as we look back over time ther
after the elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because 3,000 americans were viciously murdered by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing to do for us to go after that organization, to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place. and because of the heroic work of our men and women in uniform, and because of the cooperation and sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by that then host government. we achieved our central goal, which is -- or have come very close to achieving our stroll go central goal, which is to decapacitate al qaeda. to dismantle them. to make sure they can't attack us again. and everything that we have done over the last ten years, from the perspective of the u.s. national security interests, have been focused on that aim. and, you know, at the end of this conflict, we are going to be able to say that the sacrific
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